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Sunsetting React Native at Airbnb

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Sunsetting React Native at Airbnb

"Due to a variety of technical and organizational issues, we will be sunsetting React Native and putting all of our efforts into making native amazing." Fascinating write-up from Airbnb (part of a series) based on two years of working with React Native. It's worth reading this in full: 63% of their engineers they surveyed would have chosen React Native again given the chance and 74% would consider it for a new project - but the larger technical and organizational challenges (in particular the fact that React Native remains a polarizing choice in the mobile world, making it harder to hire great native engineers) mean that Airbnb are migrating back to pure-native for their iOS and Android apps.

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acdha
2 days ago
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Washington, DC
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sirshannon
1 day ago
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The thing nobody seems to mention is that they want to move to a new, horrible “UI defined on the server” system that will surely be even worse.

MeFi: Juneteenth

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On June 19th, 1865, Major General Gordon Granger of the United States Army arrived in Galveston, Texas. One of the orders he issued was GENERAL ORDER #3:
The people are informed that in accordance with a Proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free. This involves an absolute equality of personal rights and rights of property, between former masters and slaves, and the connection heretofore existing between them, become that between employer and hired labor.
What Is Juneteenth?, Henry Louis Gates, Jr.
When Maj. Gen. Gordon Granger issued the above order, he had no idea that, in establishing the Union Army's authority over the people of Texas, he was also establishing the basis for a holiday, "Juneteenth" ("June" plus "nineteenth"), today the most popular annual celebration of emancipation from slavery in the United States. After all, by the time Granger assumed command of the Department of Texas, the Confederate capital in Richmond had fallen; the "Executive" to whom he referred, President Lincoln, was dead; and the 13th Amendment abolishing slavery was well on its way to ratification.

But Granger wasn't just a few months late. The Emancipation Proclamation itself, ending slavery in the Confederacy (at least on paper), had taken effect two-and-a-half years before, and in the interim, close to 200,000 black men had enlisted in the fight. So, formalities aside, wasn't it all over, literally, but the shouting?


Juneteenth: 150 Years Ago, Black America Got Its Own Independence Day
There are conflicting explanations for the more than two-year delay of the news that slavery had ended in Texas. Among the possible reasons: Plantation owners withheld the news; federal troops allowed the delay so that slave owners could reap one final cotton harvest before the Emancipation Proclamation—which was issued on Jan. 1, 1863, to free the slaves in the Confederate South—was enforced; and a messenger who was on his way to Texas to deliver the news was murdered. Adding to the issue that made Texas the last holdout was that Union troops never made successful inroads against the Confederacy in that state.

Whatever the reason, June 19, 1865, is regarded as the day all enslaved people in the nation were finally free. "There were many emancipation days prior to June 19, 1865, in other states, but each of those days celebrated freedom while Texas still had enslaved people," Galveston native Sam Collins tells The Root. "Galveston, Texas, represents the last place enslaved people were freed after the Civil War. It's the day slavery finally ended everywhere in the United States, and we should celebrate that day."

"I Am A Slave" - The Roots Meet Schoolhouse Rock - black-ish

One Woman's Quest To Make Juneteenth A National Holiday - Juneteenth Should Be A Federal Holiday

12 Things You Might Not Know About Juneteenth

Clint Smith "Spent Juneteenth rereading ads taken out by formerly enslaved ppl searching for their family. Freedom was often accompanied by so much grief"

Celebrating a Second Independence Day: A Juneteenth Reading List
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Terry Gilliam Has Lost the Rights to The Man Who Killed Don Quixote

io9
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Adam Driver and Jonathan Pryce in The Man Who Killed Don Quixote.

Well, this is a strange new chapter in one of the strangest stories in modern film. For decades, famed genre director (and former Monty Python, uh, snake) Terry Gilliam struggled to make The Man Who Killed Don Quixote, his own surreal take on the classic Spanish novel. He succeeded, finally, with a rendition starring Adam Driver, and the film premiered this year at Cannes Film Festival.

Except, uh, apparently Terry Gilliam just lost the rights to it. Yes, that’s correct: as reported by Screen Rant, the Paris Court of Appeal just ruled in favor of the film’s former producer, Paulo Brancho, who sued for rights to the project on the grounds that Gilliam made the film illegally.

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According to Branco and the production company Alfama, which he owns, Gilliam and his crew did not hold the rights to make the film. As quoted by Screen Daily, Branco said:

The film belongs in its entirety to [the production company Alfama Films]. The film was made illegally. It’s the first time I’ve ever seen so many people embark on a mission to produce and exploit a film, without holding the rights. It’s a unique case.

Gilliam will also pay a little over $10,000 in damages to Alfama Films, and the company will be seeking similar recompense from the film’s production crew and the Cannes Film Festival.

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So that’s it, then: Terry Gilliam does not own The Man Who Killed Don Quixote. Will the embattled film ever get released? Will Terry Gilliam get his revenge? Will someone tell Don Quixote that those are just windmills? Who can say. I certainly can’t: this story is wild.

[Screen Rant]

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tingham
3 days ago
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Because this is the real entertainment that Gilliam meant to craft all along. The films are just a byproduct.
Cary, NC
satadru
4 days ago
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WTF
New York, NY
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Learn Core Graphics with Swift Playgrounds

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I just released my first ever playground book for Apple's Swift Playgrounds app on iPad: Learn Core Graphics. This gives you the ability to work through examples of drawing shapes, text, images, and more, all while seeing the results of your code played back right next to it.

The free book is structured as a series of challenges of increasing difficulties, and by the end you'll have learned a fair chunk of Core Graphics that you can then go on to apply elsewhere. Because it uses the real Core Graphics API rather than a simplified approach, you can literally take the code you wrote and apply it directly in your own iOS apps.

If this first book benefits enough people it's likely I'll do more in the future. So, give it a try and let me know what you think!

To learn more, and subscribe to the playground, go to this page on an iPad that has Swift Playgrounds installed: Hacking with Swift in Swift Playgrounds. You'll see a "Click to Subscribe" button there that only works on iPads with Swift Playgrounds installed, and it will subscribe you to my playgrounds feed.



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I Voted for Donald Trump

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Didn’t want it to be that way. During the primary season Mary and I and some friends wrote and paid to run full page antiTrump local ads on the day of his campaign stop in Vermont. We criticized his protectionism, misogyny, apparent racism, praise for Putin, and his practice of leaving investors and suppliers clutching the empty cloak of bankruptcy while he slipped profitably off into the night.

We were astonished as it became apparent that he really could and then did win the primary. We were equally surprised at Bernie’s strength in the other primary. Like many members of the establishment, we underestimated and under-respected the rage of people who are suffering from miserable schools, stimulus programs aimed at saving bankers, and – from their point of view – diminishing opportunity.

But he did win his primary and Hilary won hers. Now what to do? At first I thought I’d vote for Hilary; I would’ve voted for her over Obama if I’d voted in a Democratic primary; I’m not constrained by party loyalty. I admire assertive people including women. But Bernie sucked her further and further to the left on one issue after another. She radiated insincerity. The day I decided I couldn’t vote for her was the day a reporter asked if she’d wiped her email server. “You mean with a dishrag?” she smirked. The intentionally ditsy reply was an insult to women. The smirk was more than I could stomach. It seemed to cover everything from Whitewater to the Clinton Foundation to the fortunes Bill Clinton got for speaking in Russia while the sale of American uranium assets to Russia was in the hands of Hilary’s State Department. Throw in Bengasi, too.

I looked at the platform of the Libertarians. Too naively pacificist for a dangerous world.

I thought about not voting for President. Mary convinced me that was a copout, not that my vote in Vermont was going to make a difference. I filed an absentee ballot, hesitated but voted for Trump, and headed to Houston on business. Didn’t think he had a chance. The rest, of course, is history.

Why am I writing this now? Because a very intelligent and principled friend said “no use arguing with Trump voters; they’ll never change their minds about their man.” That made me realize that many intelligent and principled people are making the intellectual and political mistake of assuming that the 63 million Americans who voted for Trump are a mindless monolith. Certainly some supported Trump from the beginning. Some are racists and white supremacists.  Others were Sanders supporters appalled at the treatment their candidate got from the Democratic establishment or just angry at the establishment in general. Most Republicans had originally supported some other candidate in the primaries until Trump wore them all out. I think many people were like me; they chose what they perceived to be the lesser of two evils. Except for Trump, Clinton had the highest negatives of any major party presidential candidate in modern polling history. Trump wouldn’t like this theory, but I’m not sure he could’ve beat anybody (well, almost anybody) else.

That brings us to the next election. Suppose you want Trump outta there. I agree – and I promise you many Trump voters agree – we should do better than a petulant bully with a twitter addiction. But, if you want Trump out, just attacking him won’t do it. Didn’t work for me or others. There needs to be a credible alternative. The ballot is set up to vote FOR somebody. Whom do you think should be the candidate? Whom are you working for? What are you doing to assure that the many legitimate grievances that became Sanders and Trump votes get the attention they deserve? How are you helping the establishment reform and regain the credibility it has squandered?

In today’s New York Times Thomas Friedman sounds a code red urging all and sundry to vote for any Democrat they can find to check Trump in Congress. That may happen; Obama had a disastrous midterm but still go reelected two years later.  Voting by party label is hardly a good idea in any circumstance.

But far down in the article Friedman makes much more sense:

“… Democrats can’t count on winning by just showing up. They still have to connect with some centrist and conservative voters — and that means understanding that some things are true even if Trump believes them: We do have a trade issue with China that needs addressing; we cannot accept every immigrant, because so many people today want to escape the world of disorder into our world of order; people want a president who is going to grow the pie, not just redivide it; political correctness on some college campuses is out of control; people want to be comfortable expressing patriotism and love of country in an age where globalization can wash out those identities.”

I’d add to the list that the Iran agreement was bad for America and that China needed to be threatened with the trade weapon to get it to pressure North Korea.

I’m not sorry The Donald is president instead of Hilary; I would like to see us do better. I’ll change my vote once I have an alternative.

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3 public comments
invinciblegod
4 days ago
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People like the author are idiots. He says attacking trump won't do it and you need something to vote for. What did Trump offer over Clinton? He does not explain. This whole piece is just post justification for his decision. Since he has no sensible arguments, I can only assume he is indeed one of the people who will vote for sexism and racism as long as taxes benefits him.
sirshannon
5 days ago
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Wherein he proves the theory while stating he is the exception.
skorgu
17 days ago
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Man, fuck you.
brennen
17 days ago
Strongly concur.
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